BMW Group

InfluenceMap Score
D
Performance Band
49%
Organisation Score
48%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Automotive
Head​quarters:
Munich, Germany
Brands and Associated Companies
Rolls-Royce Motor Cars, Mini, BMW Motorrad
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: BMW has actively engaged with climate regulation in the transport sector in the US and Europe with mixed positioning in 2019-21, particularly in its support for CO2 and CAFE standards. The company retains memberships to a number of regressive trade associations and in July 2021 appeared to oppose a newly-proposed EU 2035 zero-emissions CO2 standard for light duty vehicles, while supporting higher binding EU targets for electric vehicle charging infrastructure.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: BMW has engaged with mixed positions on GHG standards for vehicles. In July 2021, BMW CEO, Oliver Zipse, appeared to oppose proposed zero-emissions EU CO2 standards for light duty vehicle by 2035 and higher 2030 targets in a public statement, arguing that “the current proposal for an even bigger cut in CO2 emissions by 2030 requires a massive further increase in market demand for electric vehicles in a short timeframe ... without significantly increased efforts by all stakeholders – including member states and all involved sectors – the proposed target is simply not viable.”

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: BMW has engaged with mixed positions on GHG standards for vehicles. In July 2021, BMW CEO, Oliver Zipse, appeared to oppose proposed zero-emissions EU CO2 standards for light duty vehicle by 2035 and higher 2030 targets in a public statement, arguing that “the current proposal for an even bigger cut in CO2 emissions by 2030 requires a massive further increase in market demand for electric vehicles in a short timeframe ... without significantly increased efforts by all stakeholders – including member states and all involved sectors – the proposed target is simply not viable.”

In the United States, while BMW did not support the Trump Administration proposal to freeze Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, the company did sign an open letter to the President calling for the standards to be rolled back in June 2019, as well as supporting the rollback of the standards in an October 2018 submission to the Environmental Protection Agency. In July 2019, BMW entered into a voluntary arrangement with California regulators that accepted the state's tailpipe standards. Whilst this agreement represented a weakening for CAFE regulations in California, the deal represents a significant increase in stringency compared to the US Federal Administration’s SAFE Act.

Positioning on Energy Transition: BMW has mixed positioning on policies to electrify transportation. In July 2021, BMW’s CEO, stated opposition to proposed EU plans to effectively phase out ICE vehicles by 2035, arguing that the EU should not ban specific technologies. Similarly, a 2020 UK consultation response from BMW opposed the phase out of ICE vehicles in the UK in the 2030s and supported a long-term role for hybrids into the 2040s. However, BMW’s CEO in 2021 also stated support for higher binding EU targets for electric vehicle charging and refuelling infrastructure in the EU. A 2020 UK consultation response from BMW also stated general support for incentives to promote electric vehicles. Reacting to Germany’s low emission vehicle package in November 2020, BMW CEO Oliver Zipse also warned that a lack of infrastructure would make the target “a very big challenge.” In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, Zipse supported a purchase premium to boost demand for new vehicles in Germany, although it was not clear whether such a purchase premium would also subsidize ICE vehicles.

Industry Association Governance: BMW discloses some of its relationships with trade associations that may be influencing climate change policy, but has not explained the position of said trade associations nor how they are trying to influence those positions. BMW has not published an audit of its industry associations and their positions. The company retains memberships to a number of groups known to be oppositional to climate regulation including the Alliance for Automotive Innovation, Business Europe and the Federation of German Industries (BDI), as well as retaining board positions on the German Automotive Association (VDA) and the European Roundtable of Industrialists. BMW's CEO, Oliver Zipse, is also President of the European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA), which is actively lobbying EU climate policy with mixed positioning.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
1 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
0 1 NA -2 NS NS NS
Supporting the Need for Regulations
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Support of UN Climate Process
0 1 NS NS 1 NS 1
Transparency on Legislation
0 NA 1 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
NS NS 1 NS NS NS NS
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS -1 -2 -2
Energy and Resource Efficiency
0 -1 NS -1 0 NS NS
Renewable Energy
1 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
1 0 1 0 0 1 1
GHG Emission Regulation
0 -1 0 0 0 -1 NS
Disclosure on Relationships
-2 NS 0 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
48%
 
48%
 
57%
 
57%
 
38%
 
38%
 
44%
 
44%
 
42%
 
42%
 
36%
 
36%
 
73%
 
73%
 
47%
 
47%
 
50%
 
50%
 
36%
 
36%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.