EDF

InfluenceMap Score
B
Performance Band
83%
Organisation Score
73%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Utilities
Head​quarters:
Paris, France
Brands and Associated Companies
EDF Energy, EDF Ostalbkreis, Unistar Nuclear Energy, Edison S.p.A

Climate Lobbying Overview: EDF seems to take predominantly positive positions on climate change policy, with high engagement on a range of key policy streams, with particularly strong support for the EU Emissions Trading System (ETS). However, the company retains active membership of associations lobbying negatively on climate policy such as MEDEF and Eurogas.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: EDF supported limiting temperature rise to 1.5°C on its corporate website in 2021, and in its 2019 Universal Registration Document stated support for the European Green Deal. In a presentation in 2020 the CEO stated that the goals of carbon neutrality in France and Europe are its “raison d’être.” EDF seems to support government regulation to respond to climate change: in feedback on the 2030 Climate Target Plan in 2020, EDF advocated that policies at European and national level become aligned with the climate neutrality objective. However, in its 2019 Universal Registration Document the company suggested that changes to climate policy could hinder the group’s development, and in its 2019 Sustainable Development Indicators report supported the need to maintain voluntary action on reducing emissions.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: EDF appears to strongly support reforms of the EU ETS. In 2020, in feedback on the EU roadmap to update the ETS, advocating for amendments to mechanisms such as the Linear Reduction Factor to increase emissions reductions. In response to the 2030 Climate Target Plan in 2020, EDF supported the extension of the ETS to the maritime sector, and conditionally supported the extension to the road and buildings sectors in tandem with existing national policies under the Effort Sharing Regulation. The group stated support for a carbon price floor in the ETS in its 2019 Universal Registration Document.

In an annual report on the 2019 European Affairs Division, EDF appeared to support various energy efficiency legislative measures in Europe, including the Renovation Wave, the Energy Efficiency Directive and the Energy Performance of Buildings Directive. In response to the EU consultation on a Renewable Financing Mechanism in 2020, the company advocated for support mechanisms to increase the deployment of renewable energy sources across the EU. Responding to the EU’s 2030 Climate Target Plan in 2020, EDF strongly supported an increased emissions reduction target of 55% and supported emissions standards to reduce emissions in the transportation sector. In feedback on the Effort Sharing Regulation (ESR) Amendment Roadmap in 2020, EDF supported the continuation of national policies under the ESR alongside the ETS.

Positioning on Energy Transition: EDF strongly supports the transition of the energy mix. In response to the roadmap on the revision of the Trans-European Energy Infrastructure (TEN-E) regulation supporting the electrification of buildings, transportation and industry and advocating against the construction of natural gas infrastructure. In an annual report on the 2019 European Affairs Division, EDF supported the decarbonization of the energy sector, and in feedback on the EU Climate Law the company advocated for the removal of fossil fuel subsidies.

Industry Association Governance: EDF, in a 2019 annual report on the European Affairs Division, disclosed a list of European trade associations of which it is a member, but did not describe their positions on climate policy, nor how EDF influences the groups. Despite its membership of WindEurope and SolarPower Europe, associations which have supported EU climate policy, EDF is also a member of Business Europe, Eurogas, and is an active member of MEDEF, who appear to aggressively oppose various strands of climate and energy policy. The company has not as of February 2021 published a report regarding misalignment of positions on climate policy.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
2 2 NA 1 NS 2 NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
2 2 NA 2 2 2 NS
Supporting the Need for Regulations
0 1 NS 2 NS 1 NS
Support of UN Climate Process
1 1 NA 2 2 2 1
Transparency on Legislation
1 NA 1 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
2 1 NS 1 2 2 NS
Emissions Trading
1 2 2 2 2 2 NS
Energy and Resource Efficiency
2 1 1 1 1 1 NS
Renewable Energy
2 1 1 2 1 1 NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
1 1 NS 1 1 1 NS
GHG Emission Regulation
2 2 NS 2 0 2 NS
Disclosure on Relationships
-1 NS 2 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
76%
 
76%
 
81%
 
81%
 
50%
 
50%
 
86%
 
86%
 
94%
 
94%
 
93%
 
93%
 
73%
 
73%
 
62%
 
62%
 
47%
 
47%
 
96%
 
96%
 
92%
 
92%
 
42%
 
42%
 
45%
 
45%
 
61%
 
61%
 
89%
 
89%
 
64%
 
64%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.