HeidelbergCement

InfluenceMap Score
D
Performance Band
48%
Organisation Score
50%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Materials
Head​quarters:
Heidelberg, Germany

Climate Lobbying Overview: HeidelbergCement has communicated more positive top-line positions on climate policy in recent years, but appears to remain negatively positioned on certain policy streams in Europe, emphasizing concerns around costs and carbon leakage. The company appears to have become less outwardly oppositional since 2015, with public engagement on these policy streams broadly reduced. However, the company retains memberships to various industry associations engaging negatively on carbon change regulations.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: HeidelbergCement's communications have appeared supportive of policy efforts to reduce emissions in 2020, although generally without referencing a clearly defined timeframe. In 2020, a senior executive advocated for a regulatory framework to manage the carbon transition and the company has also advocated to the German government to link COVID-19 recovery measures, such as state aid, to climate action. The company does not appear to have taken a public position on the European Green Deal, nor the EU 2030 Climate Target.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: In 2020, several senior executives, and the CEO of HeidelbergCement, voiced support for a carbon border adjustment mechanism in Europe in order to protect the company from carbon leakage, a member of the management board stating it is an “urgent priority.” However, in 2020 Cemnet reported that the corporation supported implementation alongside Phase IV of the EU ETS instead of replacing existing free allowances. In Heidelberg Cement's 2020 CDP disclosure, the company appeared to support the continuation of free allocation of allowances in emissions trading systems to protect against carbon leakage. In the same disclosure, the company stated support for EU energy efficiency targets but seemed to advocate for compensation and/or exemptions for heavy industry from costs resulting from renewable energy legislation.

Positioning on Energy Transition: HeidelbergCement appears to broadly support the transition to a low carbon economy and in 2020 in a review of its climate advocacy it supported policies to scale up renewable energy and hydrogen production, but also seemed to support fuels with a high biomass content. A subsidiary of the company, Norcrem, seemed to have communicated a support for high GHG emissions energy sources in the future energy mix in 2020.

Industry Association Governance: HeidelbergCement discloses a list of industry associations of which it is a member on its corporate website, but seems to have omitted several influential relationships from the list such as the Portland Cement Association and the Mouvement des Entreprises De France. The organization has published a review of its alignment with some industry associations of which it is a member, describing the climate policy positions of the associations and governance processes undertaken to assess alignment, also outlining actions taken to influence climate policy.

A detailed assessment of the company's industry association review can be found on our CA100+ webpage here.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
-1 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
1 2 NA NS 1 1 NS
Supporting the Need for Regulations
1 NS NS 1 1 1 NS
Support of UN Climate Process
1 1 NS NS 1 0 NS
Transparency on Legislation
1 NA 0 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
1 NS NS -2 0 1 NS
Emissions Trading
0 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1 -1
Energy and Resource Efficiency
0 NS 1 -2 NS NS NS
Renewable Energy
0 NS -1 -1 NS NS NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
0 1 NS NS 1 NS NS
GHG Emission Regulation
1 NS NS -2 NS 0 NS
Disclosure on Relationships
1 NS 0 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
34%
 
34%
 
53%
 
53%
 
56%
 
56%
 
47%
 
47%
 
38%
 
38%
 
55%
 
55%
 
44%
 
44%
 
52%
 
52%
 
42%
 
42%
 
45%
 
45%
 
43%
 
43%
 
68%
 
68%
 
36%
 
36%
 
46%
 
46%
 
44%
 
44%
 
74%
 
74%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.