ENEOS Holdings (formerly JX Holdings Inc)

InfluenceMap Score
D-
Performance Band
44%
Organisation Score
44%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Energy
Head​quarters:
Tokyo, Japan

Climate Lobbying Overview: ENEOS’s top line position on climate change is broadly positive, but the company has had limited engagement with specific climate regulation beyond opposition to carbon taxes. ENEOS actively engages policymakers on oil and gas policies, promoting continued expansion of the sector and the development of unconventional decarbonization technologies. ENEOS holds key climate positions with Keidanren and a number of petroleum-related lobbying associations in Japan.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: ENEOS Holdings announced the Long-Term Vision to 2040 in May 2019, which aims to achieve carbon neutrality within its own emissions and “contribute to the development of a low-carbon, recycling-oriented society”. In the 2020 update to the 2040 Long Term Vision, ENEOS recognized the severity of physical impacts of climate change. In 2021, the company stated it was making “efforts to reduce greenhouse gases, which are believed to be the cause of climate change and global warming” and acknowledged the trends under the Paris Agreement though has not stated explicit support for the treaty. The company also asked for international carbon offset mechanisms to be included in the agenda for COP25.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: ENEOS has had limited engagement with specific climate-related regulation. In 2020, ENEOS Chairman Sugimori stated opposition to carbon taxes and argued that it inhibits innovation.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Both the retail and upstream companies of the ENEOS group are actively engaged with policymakers on the oil, gas and petrochemical industry. In the Japan Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) Committee on Resources and Fuels in December 2020, the President of JX Petroleum Development expressed concern about the costs of decarbonization. In July 2020, as the acting President of the Petroleum Association of Japan (PAJ), ENEOS Chairman Sugimori promoted PAJ’s sectoral plan for “sustainable oil”, which includes the reduction of the carbon intensity of oil products and increasing the use of renewables, CCUS, carbon recycling and other innovative technology. In December 2020, the chairman argued that oil is the “last resort” to Japan’s security and called on the government to clarify the role of oil in the future energy mix. The company also asked Japanese Ministry of Economy Trade and Industry (METI) for "urgent and maximum support mobilizing all government policy measures" to increase investment into oil and gas supply chains in July 2020. ENEOS also participates in government committees on hydrogen and appears to support the official strategies.

Industry Association Governance: The company discloses a list of affiliated organizations on its website, but with limited transparency about the company’s influence within the associations or the associations’ activities. ENEOS has not published a review of its industry association memberships’ alignment on climate change. The company disclosed to CDP memberships to two organizations: the Petroleum Association of Japan and the Japan Business Federation (Keidanren), both of which have actively opposed climate policy in Japan. ENEOS Chairman Sugimori is the President of the Petroleum Association of Japan. Chairman Sugimori is also the Vice Chair of Keidanren, as well as the Chair of Keidanren’s committee on Environment and Safety, “which is in charge of global warming countermeasures at Keidanren. In 2019, ENEOS attended COP25 as a representative of Keidanren to support the Japanese government.”

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Communication of Climate Science
1 NS NA NS NS NS NS NA
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
1 NS NA -1 0 0 NS NA
Supporting the Need for Regulations
0 NS NA NS NS NS NS NA
Support of UN Climate Process
0 NS NA NS NS NS NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
-2 NA -1 NA NA NA NS NA
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS NS -1 NS NA
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy and Resource Efficiency
0 NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
NS 1 0 0 NS 0 NS NA
GHG Emission Regulation
0 NS NS NS NS 0 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NA -1 NA NA NA NS NA
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
27%
 
27%
 
41%
 
41%
 
51%
 
51%
 
64%
 
64%
 
49%
 
49%
 
35%
 
35%
 
40%
 
40%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.