Marathon Petroleum

InfluenceMap Score
F
Performance Band
18%
Organisation Score
30%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Energy
Head​quarters:
Houston, United States

Climate Lobbying Overview: Marathon Petroleum is actively and negatively lobbying on climate change regulation. While its top-line messaging appears to be mixed, it is negatively engaged with climate-related regulations and does not appear to support the energy transition. Marathon Petroleum holds memberships with numerous industry associations that typically lobby negatively on US climate regulation.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Marathon appear to be mixed in its messaging on its top-line messaging on climate policy. In 2017, it suggested that that policies should consider adaptation to climate change rather than just mitigating GHG emissions. However, Marathon's 2019 sustainability reports suggests potential support for maintaining temperature rise to well below 2°C, stating that the company's own emissions reduction plans align with the Paris Agreement.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Marathon appears to be actively, negatively engaging with climate-related regulations. Marathon has been highly critical of the US renewable fuel standard (RFS) program, previously describing it as an “abomination” and a a “deeply flawed” program. In March 2019, speaking at the American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers annual meeting, Marathon CEO Gary Heminger stated that the RFS should be repealed and that ‘fuel markets should be free, competitive, and responsive to consumers – not to government mandates’. An investigation by the New York Times in 2018 revealed the company to been one of the main actors in a strategic plan to roll back US vehicle fuel economy standards, including using Facebook advertising and lobbying at both the state and federal levels. In the same year, the company also financially supported a campaign to oppose a carbon tax in Washington state. In 2019, Marathon has stated that it supports the removal of subsidies for electric vehicles.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Marathon’s disclosures emphasize the role of fossil fuels in future energy mix and the company has called on the U.S. government to realize the “tremendous benefits” of exploiting natural gas and oil resources. In 2017, CEO Gary Heminger called into question the clean energy credentials of wind and solar versus fossil fuels. In 2019, he has continued to promote the “pivotal advantages” of fossil fuels that he claims would be out of reach if the objectives of anti-fossil fuel advocates are realized.

Industry Association Governance: Marathon discloses a list of its industry association memberships, but does not describe how aligned it is with these groups on their climate policy positions nor how it is engaging within their association governance structures. Marathon maintains high-level memberships to a number of major trade groups actively opposing US climate regulation, including board-level membership with the American Fuel & Petrochemical Manufacturers (AFPM), the American Petroleum Institute (API), and the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM).

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
1 NS NA NS NS NS -1
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
0 NS NA NS -2 NS NS
Supporting the Need for Regulations
-1 NS NA NS NS -1 NS
Support of UN Climate Process
NS NS NA NS NS NS NS
Transparency on Legislation
-1 NA -2 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
NS NS NA NS -2 NS NS
Emissions Trading
NS NS NA NA NS NS NS
Energy and Resource Efficiency
NS NS NA -2 -2 NS NS
Renewable Energy
-2 NS NA -1 NS -1 NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
-1 -1 NA NS -2 -1 NS
GHG Emission Regulation
-1 NS NA NS -2 NS NS
Disclosure on Relationships
1 NS -2 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
61%
 
61%
 
25%
 
25%
 
23%
 
23%
 
41%
 
41%
 
26%
 
26%
 
27%
 
27%
 
35%
 
35%
 
51%
 
51%
 
29%
 
29%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.