Nippon Steel Corporation

InfluenceMap Score
E
Performance Band
31%
Organisation Score
37%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Industrials
Head​quarters:
Tokyo, Japan

Climate Lobbying Overview: Nippon Steel Corporation appears to have limited engagement on climate policies and has not clearly communicated its stance on any specific climate policies or regulations. On its website, it has recognized climate variability as an important issue, and in 2019 highlighted its participation in emissions reduction initiatives. Despite this, the company appears to support the long term role for coal in the energy mix and retains memberships to several, powerful industry associations opposing climate policy.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: In its corporate environmental position statement, accessed in 2020, Nippon Steel Corporation appears to recognize the economic imperative of tackling climate change and the need for measures to reduce its sector emissions, although it also states in the same source this should be achieved through the development of a “super innovative technology”. In 2019, the company also appeared to support the export of these emission reduction technologies to other countries. On its website, the Chair of Nippon Steel, Eiji Hashimoto, appears to acknowledge the need to respond to global mega-trends including the shift to EVs and GHG emission reduction, adding that steel as a priory material will continue to be vital in global economic development (accessed 2020).

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: In its corporate environmental position statement, accessed in 2020, Nippon Steel Corporation appears to support improved energy efficiency and reduction in CO2 emission in its sector through innovative technology solutions, as well as the export of these technologies to developing countries for global CO2 reduction. However, there is no evidence of engagement with specific policy or support for standards. In 2015, its Representative Director and Executive Vice President Soichiro Sakuma gave a presentation to the 'Innovation For Cool Earth Forum' where he stated Keidanren's position, appearing to oppose legislated GHG emission reduction targets, and calling instead for a "well-balanced energy mix".

Positioning on Energy Transition: At METI's committee meeting held in March 2021, Nippon Steel suggested the 3E+S should be at the forefront of any energy mix considered and a certain level of fossil fuel sources were desirable to be included in the energy mix. Similar statement was made at an earlier meeting held in February 2021 also. At an interview held in 2020, the chair of Nippon steel appears to support an expanded role of hydrogen in the production of steel, however the source of hydrogen production was not clear.

Industry Association Governance: Nippon Steel has not disclosed a list of its memberships to industry associations, nor has it disclosed an assessment of its alignment with its industry associations on climate change.

Nippon Steel holds prominent positions and membership in key Japanese trade associations, including Japan Business Federation (Keidanren) and Japan Iron and Steel Federation (JISF). Between them, these two associations have actively opposed a number of climate regulations in Japan, including a carbon tax, an emissions trading scheme, renewable energy legislation and Japan’s long term GHG emission reduction targets.

The current Representative Director and Chairman of Nippon Steel Corporation (Shindo Kosei) is currently the Vice Chair of Keidanren, and other executives have served as Executive Chairman of Keidanren in the past (Imai Takashi, Saito Eishiro, Inayama Yoshihiro). The Representative Director and President (Hashimoto Eiji) is currently the Vice Chairman of The Japan Iron and Steel Federation (JISF). Nippon Steel's Honorary Chairman (Mimura Akio) is the Chair of the Japan Chamber of Commerce and Industry (JCCI).

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
1 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
0 0 NA 0 NS -1 NS
Supporting the Need for Regulations
-1 NS NS NS NS NS NS
Support of UN Climate Process
0 -1 NS NS NS 0 NS
Transparency on Legislation
-2 NA -2 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
-1 NS NS -1 NS NS NS
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Energy and Resource Efficiency
0 NS NS NS 0 NS NS
Renewable Energy
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
1 NS NS -1 -1 0 NS
GHG Emission Regulation
NS -2 NS NS NS NS NS
Disclosure on Relationships
-2 NS -2 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
32%
 
32%
 
41%
 
41%
 
33%
 
33%
 
31%
 
31%
 
27%
 
27%
 
62%
 
62%
 
38%
 
38%
 
61%
 
61%
 
34%
 
34%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.