PepsiCo

InfluenceMap Score
C+
Performance Band
80%
Organisation Score
40%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Consumer Staples
Head​quarters:
New York City, United States
Brands and Associated Companies
Pepsi, Gatorade, Tropicana, Quaker Oats
Official Web Site:
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview: PepsiCo appears to have a fairly limited but largely positive engagement with climate change legislation. The company’s engagement is mostly limited to high-level statements and joint letters that do not comment on climate legislation or regulation in detail.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: PepsiCo's website states support for the Paris Climate Agreement and calls for industry and government to take action in line with the IPCC’s target of 1.5 degrees Celsius. In 2019, PepsiCo participated in Ceres' LEAD on carbon pricing, reportedly meeting with policymakers to advocate for climate policy including a price on carbon. In 2020, PepsiCo formed part of an effort to support a climate-smart pandemic recovery in the US and stated support for urgent action to meet the 1.5°C pledge.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: In 2017-2019, through the Climate Leadership Council (CLC), PepsiCo has advocated for a US federal level carbon tax that is revenue-neutral through dividends, although the CLC’s previous position included support for rollbacks of other forms of carbon regulation including the Clean Power Plan. The company supported raising the ambition of the EU’s Climate Target in 2020. In 2020, PepsiCo showed support for the European Climate Law and the 2050 goal of climate-neutrality for Europe, as well as the EU Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism and EU Emissions Trading Scheme specifically.

Positioning on Energy Transition: In 2020, PepsiCo showed support for an innovative energy transition in Europe. Beyond this, InfluenceMap found little evidence of PepsiCo’s position on, or engagement with, policy related to the transition of the energy mix.

Industry Association Governance: PepsiCo discloses a list of trade associations of which it is a member, but provides limited details on the company’s role within each association and the extent to which its own climate positions align with those of the groups. PepsiCo’s Total Score is reduced as a result of its membership in powerful trade associations with largely oppositional stances on US climate policy, such as the National Association of Manufacturers. While Pepsi also remains a member of the US Chamber of Commerce, it has stated it does not share the Chamber's views on climate policy and does not serve on the Board. PepsiCo is also a member of Business Roundtable, which has begun to demonstrate a nominally positive shift on climate policy following historically mixed positions.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
2 NS NA NS NS 1 NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
1 2 NA 2 1 NS NS
Supporting the Need for Regulations
NS 2 NS 1 NS 1 NS
Support of UN Climate Process
1 2 NA NS NS 1 NS
Transparency on Legislation
-1 NA 0 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
2 NS 2 1 2 NS NS
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS 1 NS NS NS
Energy and Resource Efficiency
NS NS NS NS 2 NS NS
Renewable Energy
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
NS 2 NS 2 NS NS NS
GHG Emission Regulation
NS 2 1 NS 1 NS NS
Disclosure on Relationships
0 NA -1 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
27%
 
27%
 
52%
 
52%
 
23%
 
23%
 
76%
 
76%
 
27%
 
27%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.