Renault

InfluenceMap Score
D-
Performance Band
47%
Organisation Score
41%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Automotive
Head​quarters:
Boulogne-Billancourt, France
Brands and Associated Companies
Renault_Nissan Alliance, Automobile Dacia, Renault Samsung Motors
Wikipedia:

Renault has not disclosed transparent positions on climate change regulation in Europe, despite being a member of ACEA which has actively opposed certain EU climate policy streams for the automotive sector.

Since 2015, communications and position papers from Renault have suggested the company supports the objectives of the Paris Agreement and keeping global temperature rises under 2C.  Despite this, in Europe, evidence suggests Renault was unsupportive of CO2 tailpipe emission standards agreed in 2018, having requested weaker standards for Light Duty Vehicles when engaging with the EU Commission at the start of the policy process in 2016.  Since 2016, however, Renault seems to have become less transparent regarding is positions on EU emissions standards as well as other streams of climate policy, disclosing only a broad position on climate change in it's 2018 Biodiversity Policy.

Despite this, the company has retained board level membership of ACEA which has actively lobbied for weaker LDV and HDV CO2 tailpipe regulation up to 2018 and, in 2020, has advocated for a delay in implementation to of the standards in response to COVID-19. ACEA has however advocated in favour of certain, alternate policies to incentivize LEV and ZEV uptake, such as the increased construction of infrastructure to accommodate this process

Since 2018, Renault has also shown signs of increased support for certain forms of policy to support low-carbon transport, including consistent positive communications on electric vehicles by former CEO Carlos Ghosen.   According to its 2019 CDP disclosure, Renault has continued to advocate to EU and national policymakers for measures including consumer incentives, access to low emissions zones and the development of charging networks to support zero-emission vehicle uptake.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures EU Register
Communication of Climate Science
1 1 NS NS NS 1 NS NA
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
1 1 NA NS NS 0 NS NA
Supporting the Need for Regulations
NS NS NS NS 1 -1 NS NA
Support of UN Climate Process
1 1 NS NS 1 0 NS NA
Transparency on Legislation
-1 NA -1 NA NA NA NS NS
Carbon Tax
NS NS -1 NS -2 NS NS NA
Emissions Trading
NS NS 0 NS NS NS NS NA
Energy and Resource Efficiency
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Renewable Energy
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS NA
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
1 1 1 0 1 0 1 NA
GHG Emission Regulation
NS 0 0 -1 -1 0 NS NA
Disclosure on Relationships
-1 NS -2 NA NA NA NS NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
41%
 
41%
 
36%
 
36%
 
51%
 
51%
 
39%
 
39%
 
36%
 
36%
 
44%
 
44%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.