Toyota Motor

InfluenceMap Score
D-
Performance Band
41%
Organisation Score
40%
Relationship Score
Modifications to InfluenceMap Scoring
Sector:
Automotive
Head​quarters:
Toyota City, Japan
Brands and Associated Companies
Hino Motors , Daihatsu Motor, Toyota Financial Services
Wikipedia:

Climate Lobbying Overview Toyota is actively engaged on a variety of climate policy streams globally. Despite positive top-line messaging on climate, the company has consistently engaged in opposition to regulatory efforts to increase the stringency of emissions and fuel economy standards for vehicles across various regions globally. Furthermore, despite support for limited measures to decarbonize the transport sector, Toyota has at times been highly negative on policy mandating the electrification of the automotive sector, appearing concerned to promote an extended role for hybrid vehicles.

Top-line Messaging on Climate Policy: Toyota’s top line messaging on climate change is broadly positive and largely focused on its 2050 Environmental Challenge commitments. According to Toyota’s website (accessed January 2021), the company appears to be supportive of the need to cut GHG emissions, although it is unclear whether or not the company supports economy-wide emissions reductions in line with IPCC recommendations. In December 2018, in discussions with Japan’s government on Long Term Paris Aligned Growth, Toyota advocated for increased ambition on climate change, including supporting the setting of a national decarbonization goal. In a March 2019 article on the company’s website, Toyota appeared to signal its preference for technological solutions to address climate change over regulatory action. In a press conference held in April 2021, (transcript published on JAMA blog webpage) Toyota’s president, Akio Toyoda, appears to show broad support for Japan’s climate neutrality targets, however, suggests there is no sole path in achieving this goal and that Japan needs an expansion/mix of technology option for GHG reduction. In the same statement, he indicates opposition towards regulation on diesel/gasoline engines, stating this could limit technology options and affect Japan’s competitiveness.

Engagement with Climate-Related Regulations: Toyota has actively engaged with policymakers on various climate-related regulations. In the United States, Toyota supported the weakening of Obama-era federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards both in comments reported by Reuters in January 2019 and in October 2018 submissions to Environmental Protection Agency and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration consultations, and was part of a group of companies which wrote a letter to President Donald Trump in June 2019 proposing a weakening of the standards. In October 2019, the company intervened in a legal case to support the removal of California's ability to set its own GHG emissions standards under the state’s Clean Air Act waiver, as part of a coalition of automakers. As of February 2021, Toyota has withdrawn from this litigation.

In a press conference held in April 2021 in Japan, Toyota’s president, Akio Toyoda, suggests that regulations and legislations should follow after the expansion in technology options, and that bans on gasoline-powered or diesel cars from the very beginning would limit such options, and could also cause Japan to lose its strengths.

Toyota has also opposed strong GHG standards in regulatory consultations for vehicles in the EU in 2016 and Australia in 2017. In the latter, Toyota supported a 5-year delay in implementation of any standards and a system of non-financial penalties for breaching the standards in a 2017 consultation and, in 2018, Toyota Australia’s chief executive argued in comments reported by Motoring Australia that Australia should move away from European standards and towards harmonization with less stringent US standards. Toyota also signalled its opposition to carbon taxes in Japan on its website in March 2019, arguing that they would result in raised electricity prices, loss of international competitiveness, and decreased economic growth.

Positioning on Energy Transition: Toyota has communicated broad support for the decarbonization of transport and, between 2017 and 2021, has specifically advocated for an increased role for hydrogen on its website (accessed October 2020). However, the company has not clearly communicated whether it supports efforts to shift hydrogen production towards renewables. In November 2018, in discussions with the Cabinet of Japan on Japan’s Long term Paris Aligned Growth Strategy, Toyota’s president, Akio Toyoda, communicated broad support for the role of renewables in the energy mix, stating that they are important for Japan's competitiveness.

In a press conference held in December 2020, the Chair appeared to suggest that if EVs replaced existing cars, an increase in the energy demand will require an increase in energy supply and investment into additional infrastructure, emphasizing the concerns around capacity and cost of transitioning to EVs. The Chair also appears to state that in discussing the 2050 carbon neutrality target, major changes to the national energy policy will have to be made in order for manufacturing to also become carbon-neutral, providing comparison of a car manufactured in Japan and France where the French factories would achieve lower emissions due to the larger proportion of renewables and nuclear in the national energy mix compared with Japan. A report from Reuters in March 2021 suggests that Akio Toyoda advocated for the transition of the national energy mix with increase in renewables, in order to support the decarbonization of the auto industry manufacturing in the country.

From 2018 onwards Toyota has supported an expanded role for hybrid vehicles in the transport sector and has appeared to argue for the prioritization of hybrid vehicles over battery electric vehicles (BEVs). In the UK, Toyota Europe CEO Johan Van Zyl signalled in December 2020 the company's preference for a longer timeline for the phase out of hybrids in the UK than the 2035 date legislated by the government. This followed Toyota’s comments to the UK Business Select Committee reported in the Financial Times that committing to phase out hybrids would endanger investment in the UK in May 2018. Evidence also suggests that Toyota's Indian subsidiary, Toyota Kirloskar, opposed India’s target for 100% EV sales from 2030, according to an interview with Toyota Kirloskar vice-Chairman stating in the Hindu in December 2017. Toyota has however supported other measures to decarbonise transport in India, with Viswanathan supporting indexing vehicle taxation to emissions in an interview with the Hindu in March 2018. Toyota also emphasised the higher carbon footprint for BEV production compared to gasoline cars in a September 2020 presentation given by Toyota in a Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry committee meeting (accessed from the government's website.) In March 2021, Toyota provided evidence to the US Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee, where it appeared to push against policymaker ambition on electric vehicles by emphasizing the difficulties of electrifying road transportation and advocating for policymakers to widen their focus on BEVs to include hybrid vehicles. In a press conference held in April 2021 in Japan, Akio Toyoda appears to support the combined use of certain fuel types with ICE engines to reduce GHG emission from new and existing transport modes.

Industry Association Governance: Toyota does not provide any direct disclosure of its industry association memberships through its website and discloses only its memberships to Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA) and Keidanren through its 2020 CDP disclosure. The company has not published an audit of its industry association memberships and climate lobbying. Toyota retains high-level positions in several regressive trade associations, including JAMA, where Toyota President Akio Toyoda is chairman, Keidanren, where Toyota Vice Chairman Shigeru Hayakawa is vice chairman and the European Automobile Manufacturers Association (ACEA), where Toyota Europe Chairman Didier Leroy is a board member. Toyota also retains membership to several other associations, including the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM) in the US, Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders (SMMT) in the UK, and the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers (SIAM) in India.

QUERIES
DATA SOURCES
Main Web Site Social Media CDP Responses Legislative Consultations Media Reports CEO Messaging Financial Disclosures
Communication of Climate Science
1 2 NS NS NS NS NS
Alignment with IPCC on Climate Action
0 1 NA 1 0 0 0
Supporting the Need for Regulations
NS 0 NS 1 0 0 NS
Support of UN Climate Process
1 1 NA NS NS NS NS
Transparency on Legislation
-2 NA -2 NA NA NA NS
Carbon Tax
NS NS NS NS -2 NS NS
Emissions Trading
NS NS NS NS NS NS NS
Energy and Resource Efficiency
NS -1 NS -1 -1 NS 1
Renewable Energy
0 NS NS NS NS 1 NS
Energy Transition & Zero Carbon Technologies
1 1 NS 0 -1 0 NS
GHG Emission Regulation
NS -1 NS -1 -1 NS NS
Disclosure on Relationships
-2 NS -1 NA NA NA NS
Strength of Relationship
STRONG
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEAK
 
48%
 
48%
 
25%
 
25%
 
41%
 
41%
 
48%
 
48%
 
36%
 
36%
 
34%
 
34%
 
27%
 
27%
 
23%
 
23%
 
38%
 
38%
 
60%
 
60%
 
48%
 
48%
 
50%
 
50%
 
36%
 
36%
 
73%
 
73%

How to Read our Relationship Score Map

In this section, we depict graphically the relationships the corporation has with trade associations, federations, advocacy groups and other third parties who may be acting on their behalf to influence climate change policy. Each of the columns above represents one relationship the corporation appears to have with such a third party. In these columns, the top, dark section represents the strength of the relationship the corporation has with the influencer. For example if a corporation's senior executive also held a key role in the trade association, we would deem this to be a strong relationship and it would be on the far left of the chart above, with the weaker ones to the right. Click on these grey shaded upper sections for details of these relationships. The middle section contains a link to the organization score details of the influencer concerned, so you can see the details of its climate change policy influence. Click on the middle sections for for details of the trade associations. The lower section contains the organization score of that influencer, the lower the more negatively it is influencing climate policy.